Advocacy, An Issue of Perioperative Nursing Clinics - E-Book (The Clinics: Nursing)

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We would be going up and down. Sometimes I use my phone to make calls for patients. In the space of 15 minutes and after 50ml the child was sitting up. The participants believed that they were empathetic, nurturing, ethical, assertive and persistent; traits which made them better patient advocates than other members of the health team. However, certain states such as fatigue and frustration often interfered with the performance of patient advocacy. These findings are consistent with earlier findings that certain nurse characteristics influence patient advocacy [ 3 — 5 ].

However, just one participant lent a listening ear to a patient who was lamenting about his problems [ 23 ]. Nurses felt that because they were close, more approachable and accessible to the patients, they perceived them to be less threatening than other health professionals [ 10 , 25 , 26 ]. They also educated and counseled patients and relatives [ 25 , 27 ] and assisted them with navigation of the health system [ 7 , 28 ]. Again, they cared for babies on the ward in the absence of their caregivers [ 29 ], settled misunderstandings between patients and other staff and comforted angry patients [ 25 ].

The participants were ethical and perceived the role as a moral responsibility [ 5 ], encouraged patient involvement in their care and respected their right to refuse treatment [ 4 , 30 ].